Give female refugees work to reduce domestic violence, Tenaganita tells Putrajaya

by Gan Pei Ling, 13 Dec 2017 © The Malaysian Insight

FINANCIALLY independent refugee women are more resilient in the face of domestic violence, says human rights group Tenaganita executive director Glorene A. Das.

“Refugee women who are breadwinners are more respected in their communities,” Glorene told reporters after an event to commemorate the global 16 days of activism against gender-based violence at Tenaganita’s headquarters in Petaling Jaya today.

She said even community leaders in local refugee communities respected women who provide for their families.

Malaysia only allowed Rohingya refugees from Myanmar to seek legal work in Malaysia on March 1.

There are 150,204 refugees and asylum seekers from 59 countries registered with the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees in Malaysia as of May 31 this year.

Burmese (133,725) make up the bulk of number, followed by refugees and asylum seekers from Pakistan (3,548), Sri Lanka (2,328), Yemen (2,095), Somalia (2,062), Syria (1,980), Iraq (1,461), Afghanistan (1,082), Palestine (698) and Iran (440).

Although Malaysia now allows Rohingya refugee women to work, cultural beliefs remain a formidable barrier towards economic independence and a life free of violence.

A study conducted by Tenaganita and University of Colorado Institute of Behavioural Science between March and May this year found all 30 Rohingya adults from a community in Gombak, Selangor, believed women should obey their husbands and need their permission to work.

More than 90% of the 15 women surveyed said they have been physically or verbally abused by their spouse.

Only 40% of the women believe it is a woman’s fate to be abused but 73% of the men believe so.

Sixty percent of the women and all the men believe there is no point in telling others about such abuses.

The findings are from the first stage of a two-year study funded by the US Bureau of Population, Refugees and Migration.

The remaining three stages of the study involve designing a communication campaign to empower Rohingya women in Malaysia.

Why Chinese voters still favour the opposition

by Gan Pei Ling, 28 Nov 2017 © The Malaysian Insight

AT a kopitiam in Pandamaran town, Klang, the owner and his regular customers laughed when asked why local Chinese do not support MCA and Barisan Nasional any more.

To them, the question seemed rhetorical and answers were obvious: The weak ringgit, government mismanagement and alleged corruption and the rising cost of living.

Many Chinese Malaysian voters, who make up 29.68% of the voting population, remain strong in their support for the opposition, as they have since the watershed election of 2008 when BN was denied its customary two-thirds majority and lost four more states to the opposition.

“We don’t care whether it’s a white cat or black cat, as long as it can catch  rats (corrupt politicians and civil servants), it’s a good cat,” said Charlie, an elderly customer at the kopitiam.

He said BN’s mismanagement of the country’s economy, corruption and wastage had led to a weak ringgit, resulting in the people struggling with rising cost of living.

“Our ringgit has weakened significantly compared to the Thai baht and Singapore dollar over the years. We used to be able to get 1,100 baht or more with RM100, now it’s only 770 baht.

“Our exchange rate with Singapore was RM2 to SG$1, now it’s more than RM3! Don’t you think importers and locals who do business with them feel the pinch?” said the retired businessman.

The kopitiam owner, Mark Gor, said few locals bought into BN’s rhetoric that the economy was doing well with its GDP growth, foreign investment figures and upcoming mega projects like the East Cost Rail Link or proposed upgrading of the ports in Klang and Kuantan.

“How much money is actually ending up in the people’s pockets? Everything is more expensive now because of GST (Goods and Services Tax).

“Times are tough for small- and medium-sized businesses. Many kopitiam in Bukit Tinggi (another town in Klang) have closed in the past few years to become hawkers (to save on rent).

“A friend of mine used to have four hardware shops, but had to close three and is now managing with just one.

“Many local construction subcontractors are also out of jobs. He is one of them who hasn’t had work for more than a year (he pointed to a customer seated at another table).

“Even if they are offered work, they are worried if they will get paid,” he said.

MCA still seen as Umno proxy

A combination of factors led to a 40% swing in Chinese support to the opposition in the 2008 polls, including the use of social media and greater political frustration.

This surge in support for the opposition also swept traditional MCA strongholds like Pandamaran, which has been held by the ruling Chinese party since the state seat was created in 1984.

The semi-urban seat in Selangor was abolished after the first two elections and re-established when electoral boundaries were redrawn for the 2004 elections. That year, MCA’s candidate Teh Kim Poo beat DAP’s Tee Boon Hock to clinch the seat.

However, in the 2008 and 2013 electins, Pandamaran voters ditched MCA for DAP. The Chinese-majority opposition party won 63.7% of the votes in 2008 and 68.75% in 2013.

What happened in Pandamaran was reflective of a larger shift among Chinese Malaysians in the 2008 and 2013 elections.

“Usually the Chinese would split their vote for Parliament and state seats. In 2008 and 2013, it was synchronised, with all their votes going to the opposition for both Parliament and state seats,” said Merdeka Center For Opinion Research’s research manager Tan Seng Keat.

MCA suffered its worst electoral outing in 2013, winning only seven out of 37 parliamentary seats and 11 out of 90 state seats it contested. In comparison, DAP won 38 out of 51 parliamentary seats and 95 out of 103 state seats it contested.

BN chairman Najib Razak has challenged MCA to win at least 15 parliamentary seats in the next elections to justify the three cabinet posts the party holds.

MCA president Liow Tiong Lai boldly proclaimed during the party’s annual general assembly that DAP would tumble in the 14th general election.

However, Tan said many Chinese still perceived MCA as a proxy of Umno, and it was ineffective in addressing their core concerns of the country’s economy and governance.

Attributing it partly to DAP’s successful campaign, Tan said the perception that MCA ministers and the party could not do much for the Chinese community persists among most Chinese voters.

In a September poll conducted by Merdeka Center, more than two-thirds of Chinese respondents (68%) believe the country was going in the wrong direction, compared with 51% in a similar poll done in April 2013 prior to the elections.

Tan predicts that even if there was a voter swing back to MCA in the next polls, it would come from traditional MCA supporters who voted for the opposition in 2013 in the hope for a change of government.

MCA is said to have some 1.09 million members and is the second largest component party in BN. However, only 661,469 Chinese voters (18.4%) voted for BN in 2013, while 2.92 million (81.5%) voted for the now defunct opposition bloc Pakatan Rakyat.

Tan said MCA and BN were unlikely to win back youth votes, where between 90% and 92% of voters between the ages of 21 and 30 voted for the opposition in 2013.

He said a small number of Chinese voters, particularly youth, disillusioned with the opposition’s infighting might spoil their vote or not turn up to vote, but that would not affect the larger trend.

Cost of living top Chinese voters’ concern

Tan believes the GE14 will be a “GST elections”.

“A lot of people talk about 1MDB (1Malaysia Development Bhd) but that is factored into the broader good governance and leadership issue.”

An Institut Darul Ehsan (IDE) survey in August found that more than two-thirds of the Chinese respondents (68%) still favoured Pakatan Harapan. Only 21% supported BN, while 7% were undecided and 4% supported PAS.

IDE also found that the rising prices of goods topped the list of concerns among Chinese respondents (53%), followed by the pressures of life (23%), wages (10%), crime and social issues (6%), infrastructure development (5%), unemployment (2%) and other issues (3%).

Tan Ah Poh (not her real name), 80, who has been running a sundry shop in Pandamaran for almost six decades, said GST and rising goods prices have hit her business hard.

“My shop is busiest in the beginning of the month, when people just got their salaries. By the middle of the month, there will be fewer customers. Towards the end of the month, it can grow so quiet that I could doze off,” she said.

“Even during the 1997-1998 financial crisis, business wasn’t as bad as it is now,” she added.

She said she understood that other countries had GST, but in those countries, the people’s wages were higher, too.

“Our wages are low. When the people don’t have enough cash to spare, they shop less,” said the grandmother with only primary school education.

“The rich are okay, but the poor are doing worse,” she said.

Pessimism may see lower Chinese youth turnout in GE14

by Gan Pei Ling, 28 Nov 2017 © The Malaysian Insight

UNINSPIRED and pessimistic.

That’s how more politically aware Chinese Malaysian youth would describe the prevalent mood of their counterparts in the run up to the 14th general election that must be held by next August.

Chin Ching Xuan, 29, an administrative worker from Johor Baru, said she would vote in the next election, but she was not impressed by politicians on both sides of the divide compared to 2013.

“Honestly, I haven’t decided who I will vote for. Very few of them (the politicians) are genuinely in it for the people.

“Most of them are either in it for the power, status or money, but don’t go overboard lah,” said Chin, a voter in Tebrau, a traditional BN stronghold currently held by MCA’s Khoo Soo Seang.

“It doesn’t matter who they put as the candidate in Tebrau, BN will probably still win,” she said.

First-time voter Lim Pau Hau, 23, a final-year international relations student at Universiti Utara Malaysia, told The Malaysian Insight he was an anomaly among his peers.

“I’ll definitely vote, but most of my peers are more worried about their career prospects and money, whether they can survive their internship with RM500 a month or less, and their starting salaries when they graduate,” said Lim.

Lim is also a student activist with a two-decade-old university youth group – Malaysia Youth and Students Democratic Movement (Dema).

“Most (students) don’t really care about politics and political parties, whether it’s BN, PKR, DAP or PAS, or whether Dr Mahathir (Mohamad) is now in the same camp with (DAP veteran) Lim Kit Siang.

“They know about these parties by name but they don’t know how to differentiate between a state assemblyman and member of parliament,” said the youth from Labis, Johor.

He blames their political apathy on the lack of quality civic education in Malaysia.

Lim said his political exposure came from his father, who was an MCA member, General Studies in Form Six, campus politics in UUM, and observing the 2013 elections in Labis.

Labis, a traditional BN stronghold, was won by MCA’s Chua Tee Yong with a 353-vote majority in 2013.

Labis and Segamat in Johor, and Tanjung Malim in Perak, are traditional BN strongholds that were won with small majorities and where slightly more than 60% of the Chinese voted for the opposition in 2008.

That support rose to between 80% and 90% in 2013, said Merdeka Center for Opinion Research research manager Tan Seng Keat.

Chinese Malaysians contributed to more than half of the popular vote won by the now defunct opposition bloc Pakatan Rakyat in 2013, at 50.21% or 2.92 million votes.

PR – then composing DAP, PKR and PAS – won 52% of the 11 million votes cast in 2013, but gained only 89 out of the 222 federal seats.

This was due to the disproportionate structure of seats and Malaysia’s first-past-the-post voting system.

Tan said a decline of Chinese voter turnout of between 10% and 15%, due to a lower prospect of changing the federal government and political fatigue, could hurt the opposition’s chances in the next elections.

He said voter turnout among Chinese youth could be significantly lower.

Tan recalled that about 300,000 new voters were registered every quarter in the run-up to 2013 and Chinese youth were excited about a potential change in the federal government.

That enthusiasm had died down post-2013 elections, and he sees no signs of it being revived as the 14th general election draws closer.

“Chinese youth are less and less politicised. They are much more critical of BN but at the same time they are uninspired by opposition figures, unlike in previous general elections.

“Some of them may spoil their votes or not turn out to vote at all.

“Those who work or study outstations or overseas may not return to vote, like in 2013,” said Tan.

More KL folk take on City Hall to save suburbs from development

by Gan Pei Ling, 18 Nov 2017 © The Malaysian Insight

RETIRED civil engineer Frank Yeh and other residents in the newly set up Protect Taman Desa Coalition have never been activists in their lives.

But plans for new projects in their Kuala Lumpur suburb of Taman Desa — 13 new developments in all, including high-density condominiums — made them decide to step up last year.

“It’s too much, way too much. The roads are already congested and the water pressure is low. This is not sustainable development. The authorities should improve the local infrastructure before they approve more development projects,” Yeh told The Malaysian Insight.

The coalition is backing a suit filed by 11 residents against Kuala Lumpur City Hall (DBKL) for approving a project of three condominium blocks – The Address, on Tenaga Nasional Bhd reserve land.

The suit was filed in March and the court will hear on November 29 the developer’s application to be made a party to the suit.

“We’re not against development per se. We are against overdevelopment. The existing infrastructure in Taman Desa is inadequate to support these new projects.

“Since 1977, there has only been one bus route servicing Taman Desa. The main water pipes are old and rusted. Existing roads also need to be re-tarred,” said Yeh.

He said current public amenities such as a small community hall and a few fields in the neighbourhood were insufficient to cater to the needs of the existing population of 38,000 people.

The Address — to comprise 649 units in three blocks between 34 and 42 storeys high — is to be built on a site marked for utilities and not for development. Furthermore, according to the KL Draft City Plan 2020, the site was supposed to be gazetted as a green lung.

If built, the condominium would increase the area’s population density from 60 people per acre to 650 per acre.

The other dozen projects in the pipeline for Taman Desa will add more than 7,000 affordable homes and condominium units, 48 shoplots and 168 office units to the neighbourhood.

“This is not just Taman Desa’s problem. Overdevelopment is happening all around us,” said another Taman Desa resident M. Gunasekar.

He was shocked to find out recently that a 52-storey high condominium will be built on a 1.3 acre plot of land, previously a playground, behind his home at Armada Villa, Danau Desa.

The Protect Taman Desa Coalition is holding a press conference to voice their concerns about the project today.

“I’ve been trying to help solve other people’s problems all my life. Now, I’m a victim. I couldn’t protect my own backyard,” said the businessman, who helped gather nearly 1,000 residents to submit their individual objections to DBKL against The Address last year.

No paradise in suburbia

The Protect Taman Desa Coalition is not the first suburban community in the Klang Valley to speak up against development that threatens their quality of life. As developers seek new spaces in already congested areas for more projects, residents have begun to fight back.

Residents in the affluent Taman Tun Dr Ismail housing suburb have become increasingly vocal in opposing projects they fear will congest the neighbourhood further and encroach on the only two green lungs in their area: Taman Rimba Kiara and Bukit Kiara.

The residents took DBKL and the mayor to court this year for approving a high-rise housing project in Taman Rimba Kiara. The Kuala Lumpur High Court granted the residents’ leave for judicial review in August 2017.

In 2015, Petaling Jaya residents foiled the Selangor State Development Corporation’s (PKNS) plan to develop a field and sports complex it owned in Kelana Jaya into a sports city.

The Petaling Jaya City Council had came under fire for altering the field’s status from recreational to commercial without going through due process in 2011, and eventually cancelled the developer’s application in 2015.

In 2011, Subang Jaya residents defeated Sime Darby Properties’ bid to build a 350-unit condominium and extend its medical centre on 7.7ha of the 29.39ha Subang Ria Park.

The Selangor Town and Country Planning Department Appeals Board rejected Sime Darby’s application for planning permission on the ground that the park was gazetted in Subang Jaya’s local draft plan for recreational use.

Philip Phang, a retired accountant and another spokesperson of the Protect Taman Desa Coalition, said DBKL should have consulted the residents before approving the development projects and altering recreational land for commercial purposes.

The residents had to find out about the development projects through their own research and are funding the campaign to rally and inform other residents out of their own pockets.

“Have they (DBKL) taken into account the wellbeing of the people they are entrusted to protect before approving these projects? The development process was not transparent. The residents are also being deprived of amenities they rightfully deserve,” said Phang.

He has lived there for more than four decades and has watched Taman Desa transform from a green neighbourhood, with fresh air and morning mist, to its now congested state, with high-rise condominiums being built and traffic jams to no end.

“We know this is going to be a long battle. We’re going up against an institution (DBKL) and, indirectly, the developers, but somebody has to do it for the sake of future generation of Malaysians as a whole,” said Phang.

“Nothing is safe if this goes on. You may think you’re buying a house next to a green lung, but 10 years down the road it may turn into a condominium.

“We want to warn potential buyers to think twice,” said Yeh.

He said another group of residents from the Taman Desa Residents’ Association are also running a campaign against the development projects, in collaboration with DAP’s Seputeh MP Teresa Kok.

“We decided to set up our own group and run our own campaign as we want to remain independent and non-partisan,” he said.

Charity homes running on empty

by Gan Pei Ling, 6 November 2017 © The Malaysian Insight

GROWING public apathy is pushing some charity homes in the Klang Valley into debt, as personal and corporate sponsors cut back on financial support in the light of rising cost of living.

For the Kirtarsh Home for Children with Disabilities, electricity and water cuts have become a regular occurrence recently, said owner Judith Pamela Muthiah.

Judith, 45, said the home which houses 50 orphans, senior citizens and people with disabilities aged between seven and 102 needs up to RM25,000 a month to cover food, utilities and staff salaries.

She said the amount was already considered small, as rental of the home’s premises is a mere “RM1” token fee to the owner.

Still, obtaining funding to cover the monthly expenses has become near impossible, she said.

“At best we get ‘durian runtuh’ (one-off donation) of a few thousand ringgit, especially during festive seasons, and we’ll use it to pay the urgent bills first,” she said.

“Sometimes we do receive calls from companies, but when they find out we’re in Bukit Beruntung, they said they would look for charities nearer to them,” she said.

The home has tried to appeal to the Social Welfare Department and corporations for regular financial support to no avail.

Judith quit her full-time job as a preschool teacher several years ago to help her husband Mani @ Wannan Kanan, 49, run the home.

Mani’s late brother, a person with disability, started the home in 1999 to help others like himself.

Apart from the husband-and-wife team, the home has four staff members, who are former residents of the home, trained to become caretakers and driver.

Judith said the home has had to delay paying their salaries because of the shortage of funds.

“Fortunately, they have been very understanding,” she told The Malaysian Insight.

“We have hired caretakers, but we found that they abused the residents when we are not around, so we no longer hire outsiders.

“This isn’t a job you can do if you just want to earn money,” she said.

Charity homes that do not have land tenure security like Kirtarsh have chalked up even larger debts from rental arrears, and most can ill-afford to even hire full-timers.

S.K. Manimaran, 51, founder of the Siddharthan Care Centre in Petaling Jaya has accumulated RM120,000 in rental debt.

The centre, which was set up in 2008, currently cares for 19 orphans and children with disabilities aged between six and 12.

“The rental is RM3,500 a month. Luckily, the landlord has been understanding,” said the freelance marketing executive.

The centre does not have any staff. To save cost, his wife, sisters, daughter and in-laws double up as caretakers for the children.

Murugan, a Komuter train driver and founder of Pusat Jagaan Sai Annai Illam in Pandamaran, Port Klang, 54, makes do with just one full-time staff member.

“The other (full-timer) is my wife. The others – me, my daughter (22), son (21), and brother-in-law are all part-time.”

He has accumulated two years’ worth of rent amounting to RM19,200, and owes electricity provider Tenaga Nasional Bhd and water supplier Syarikat Bekalan Air Selangor Sdn Bhd at least RM1,000 each in arrears.

Despite the tough times, Murugan still dreams of building a permanent home for the 30 orphans, single mothers and senior citizens he and his family members are looking after.

“I just need the land. I already have contractors who offered to provide free cement to help me build the shelter,” said Murugan.

The three homes are part of a group of 10 charities in the Klang Valley which banded together for the first time to jointly organise a fundraising concert on November 25 at Stadium Melawati, Shah Alam.

Francis Siva, 58, the founder of Independent Living Training Centre which trains people with spinal cord injury to live independently, said they hope to raise at least RM1.2 million from the concert so that each charity can take home RM100,000.

The cost of organising the concert is estimated at about RM200,000.

“The RM100,000 is a lifeline that will help sustain us for the coming year,” he said.

His centre, which currently has 10 residents, receives donations from regular donors and foundations, such as the Kuok Foundation, but these, too, have declined over the past two years due to the economic downturn.

Besides supporting the concert, Judith said any good Samaritan or business that could adopt the homes’ monthly utility bills, rental, staff salary or other regular expenses would be offering a huge financial relief to the founders.

“We also need tutors for the children and doctors for the senior citizens, to just visit once a week or month would be great.

“That would help us save on tuition cost and transport cost and time to the hospitals.

“And to play games with them (the residents). They would really appreciate it,” said Judith.

Why so secretive, civil society asks Selangor, Penang

by Gan Pei Ling, 31 October 2017 © The Malaysian Insight

THE Selangor and Penang administrations have come under fire for their lacklustre implementation of the freedom of information (FOI) law, with civil society groups saying that citizens’ access to state information remains largely unchanged since its introduction.

The sunshine law was enacted in 2011 to promote greater transparency and accountability, by allowing the public access to state information.

However, six years on, both state governments have done “very little or nothing at all to promote the use of the FOI”, said corruption watchdog Centre to Combat Corruption and Cronyism (C4) executive director Cynthia Gabriel.

“There is zero publicity from the state governments. This is very unfortunate, even disappointing,” Cynthia told The Malaysian Insight.

Cynthia, formerly a councillor with the Petaling Jaya City Council, said Penang Deputy Chief Minister II Dr P. Ramasamy and Selangor Speaker Hannah Yeoh were among the handful of Pakatan Harapan politicians who have raised public awareness about the FOI.

“The citizens of these states could have used the law more proactively to show the Barisan Nasional-ruled states how an FOI law can be used to improve their quality of life,” said Cynthia.

Due to the low public awareness, Penang only received 71 FOI requests in 2015 and 41 as of June 2016, Dr Ramasamy told a forum hosted by the Penang Institute last year.

Selangor received 163 FOI applications between 2013 and 2015, out of which only five requests were unsuccessful.

Critics have pointed out that these five include requests for the declassification of high-profile cases, such as the Selangor water agreement and documents related to the Kidex highway.

The Malaysian Insight’s efforts to get the latest numbers of successful and rejected FOI requests from both state administrations were unsuccessful. “At the time of publication, the state governments are compiling the data.”

Last year, C4 partnered with another local transparency watchdog, Sinar Project, to launch the Right 2 Know Malaysia campaign, aimed at helping Malaysians learn about the FOI via a website and public talks.

Sinar Project coordinator Khairil Yusof said that the project set out to test how well the FOI law worked in practice at the local council and state level requests.

They found that the Selangor FOI law and process was much better in practice than Penang.

However, the group was surprised that the Selangor executive council denied their request for information on the expenditure of excos under former menteri besar Khalid Ibrahim as well as current Menteri Besar Azmin Ali.

Khairil said the rejection of their request appeared to show that the Selangor administration is not willing to be fully transparent when it comes to executive councillors’ expenditure.

Selangor also denied requests to make public information regarding controversial projects and agreements, such as the Damansara-Shah Alam Elevated Expressway (DASH) and the state’s water agreement.

In response to criticism on the implementation of the FOI law, Selangor’s Select Committee on Competency, Accountability and Transparency (Selcat) carried out a public hearing in January 2015 to review the implementation of the law.

Selangor executive councillor Elizabeth Wong was put in charge of overseeing the FOI implementation but did not respond to interview requests at press time.

Cynthia from C4 also said that the FOI would always fall short of its ideals of greater transparency as long as restrictive laws, such as the Official Secrets Act (OSA), supersedes it.

“The OSA still supersedes the state FOI enactments. Information on highway projects, infrastructure and road works has been denied on such grounds.”

She said Malaysia, which aims to become a developed country by 2020, must reform the OSA if it is sincere in eradicating corruption.